God and Nature – Native American Series

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Rain plan for October 14 – Meet in Asbury Hall at the Main Campus.

“Around the world, 7,500 languages have a word for someone greater than themselves. We call Him God. Creation stories turn into migration stories. Native Americans see God in nature, the evolving and fluid connection to creation itself. Their ground is holy ground.

The trees and the rocks are a part of nature – of creation. Native American ceremonies show respect to Creator God; we cleanse ourselves from the grime of the world and our shortfalls; we bring ourselves to water – all these aspects are a part of traditional way of responding to God. In this series, my prayer is that we can re-connect with the mindset that all is holy. We’ll take time out of the busyness of life and step back to see God in nature and in ourselves as He meant it to be.” Mary T., UMC Committee on Native American Ministries.

We’ll have four opportunities in God in Nature: Native American Series to explore, worship and experience God through traditional prayer forms, blessings and ceremonies culminating in an outdoor Sunset Worship on Sunday, November 4. All gatherings will start at Historic House at the end of Tree-Lined Lane from 2:30-4:00 p.m.

September 16: “The Sacred Circle of Life”  
September 30: “Cleansing Ourselves – Drawing Nearer to God”
October 7: “Raising Our Prayers to God”
October 14: “Water Is Life”


God in Nature: Native American Series, October 14

The Spiritual Power of Water (Part 4 of 4). Water is sacred. Water is life. Water is God’s gift to all creation. Our water ceremony will put us in touch with water literally and figuratively. “One is in touch with water from which creation began, in touch with water which surrounded life in the Mother’s womb, in touch with one’s baptism…in touch with the Mystery.”  -Dayton Edmonds (Retired United Methodist Missionary & full-blooded Native American of the Caddo nation.)

This ceremony is a time of gratitude, awareness and remembrance. Through it we seek to recognize the sacredness and holiness of water as the lifeblood of God’s physical and spiritual creation.

 

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